Ontario launching new Competition for Renewable Energy Projects

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Ontario launching new Competition for Renewable Energy Projects

Ontario (Canada) is continuing to secure a clean energy future by launching a second phase of the competitive Large Renewable Procurement (LRP) process.

The LRP, which replaced the large Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program, covers renewable energy projects generally larger than 500 kilowatts (kW) and was designed to strike a balance between community engagement and achieving value for ratepayers.

Working with the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), a Request for Qualifications process will be issued by August 1, 2016 for 930 MW of renewable energy from solar photovoltaic, wind, hydroelectric and bioenergy sources, following engagement with stakeholders, municipalities and Indigenous communities.

The province will continue to ensure renewable energy procurement encouraging the selection of projects with local support and competitive prices, as well as projects with First Nation and Métis participation. Based on the results of the first phase of the LRP (LRP I), it is expected that US$3.3 billion in LRP costs will be removed relative to the 2013 Long-Term Energy Plan (LTEP) forecast, saving the typical residential electricity consumer an average of US$1.67 per month on their electricity bill over the forecast period.

The next phase of the Large Renewable Procurement (LRP II) will ensure Ontario remains a global leader in clean energy development. There are more than 30 solar and wind manufacturers operating in communities across the province.

In March 2016, the IESO offered contracts to 16 successful LRP proponents, for a total of almost 455 MW of renewable energy capacity. Of the 16 projects that received contracts, 75 per cent received support from local municipalities.

Bob Chiarelli, Minister of Energy, stated:

“Ontario is a North American leader in the development of renewable energy projects. By putting emphasis on price and community support, the next phase of renewable energy procurement will save consumers money by putting further downward pressure on electricity prices.”

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